Question: How Can I Use Was In English?

How do you use was and were in English?

If you want to remember easily, you can think of was/were as the past tense form of the auxiliary verbs am, is and are.

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects.

So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they..

Is there were correct grammar?

1 Answer. Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. In my house, there were many toys. If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile.

Are is used for?

When deciding whether to use is or are, look at whether the noun is plural or singular. If the noun is singular, use is. If it is plural or there is more than one noun, use are. The cat is eating all of his food.

How use had and have in English?

‘Had’ is the past tense of both ‘has’ and ‘have’.have. Have is used with some pronouns and plural nouns: … has. Has is used with the third person singular. … contractions. I have = I’ve. … negative contractions. … ‘have’ and ‘has’ in questions. … ‘have got’ and ‘have’ … ‘have’ and ‘has’ verb tenses. … modal verbs: ‘have to’More items…•

How is their spelled?

Their has the word heir in it, which can act as a reminder that the term indicates possession. … They’re has an apostrophe, which means it’s the product of two words: they are. If you can substitute they are into your sentence and retain the meaning, then they’re is the correct homophone to use.

Where we use has have had?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it). In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had. We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well.

What is difference between had and have?

The “have” is a present-tense state-of-being verb. The “seen” is a verb without any tense but with the perfect aspect. … In 3), the “had” is a past-tense state-of-being verb.

How we use were in a sentence?

Commonly Confused Words: were / we’re / where Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. Look at this example of were used in a sentence. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use.

Is Am are use in English?

Singular, Plural and Is, am, are Am is used with first person singular (I) Is – is used with third person singular (he, she, Ramu, Manisha) Are – is used with third person plural (They, Indians, judges)

Are have has?

While the verb to have has many different meanings, its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.” Have and has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used with the pronouns I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it.

Is it I was or I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

How do you use the would in English?

‘will’ and ‘would’We use will:would is the past tense form of will. … We use will to express beliefs about the present or future:We use would as the past of will, to describe past beliefs about the future:We use would as the past tense of will:We use I will or We will to make promises and offers:More items…

Is Am are called?

An auxiliary verb (or a helping verb as it’s also called) is used with a main verb to help express the main verb’s tense, mood, or voice. The main auxiliary verbs are to be, to have, and to do. They appear in the following forms: To Be: am, is, are, was, were, being, been, will be.

Is it if there were or if there was?

Just as “he was” becomes “he were” in the subjunctive, “there was” becomes “there were.” So the answer to Jessica’s question is that “were” is the correct choice. Form 3’s existence is purely hypothetical, so the subjunctive would be “If there were a Form 3.”

Has been or had been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.